Home

Herpetiform recurrent aphthous stomatitis

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and herpetiform ulcerations J Mich Dent Assoc. 1984 Oct;66(10):357-63. Authors V A Merchant, J A Molinari. PMID: 6593469 No abstract available. MeSH terms Diagnosis, Differential Humans Recurrence Stomatitis, Aphthous / classification. 1. J Mich Dent Assoc. 1984 Oct;66(10):357-63. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and herpetiform ulcerations. Merchant VA, Molinari JA. PMID: 659346 Recurrent apthous stomatitis is a very common, recurrent painful ulceration occurring in the oral cavity. The etiopathogenesis of this disease is yet unclear. Treatment strategies must be directed toward providing symptomatic relief by reducing pain, increasing the duration of ulcer-free periods, and accelerating ulcer healing Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases characterized by recurrent and painful ulcerations on the movable or nonkeratinized oral mucosae. Clinically, three types of RAS, namely minor, major, and herpetiform types, can be identified. RAS more commonly affects labial mucosa, buccal mucosa, and tongue

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and herpetiform ulceration

  1. HSV is an infectious disease that often presents with vesicles that quickly ulcerate and involve the keratinized mucosa of the hard palate, dorsal tongue and attached gingiva. Herpetiform aphthous..
  2. Sometimes patients are unlucky enough that they have major aphthous stomatitis. This can look really scary. It is very painful, and the lesions will resolve within a couple weeks. Patients may or may not have a couple episodes of major aphthous stomatitis a year
  3. Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis & Oral Herpes Dr. Ross Kerr Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Pathology, Radiology & Medicine New York University College of Dentistry Diplomate, American Board of Oral Medicine 212-998-9885 ark3@nyu.ed

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis consists of round or oval shaped ulcers with an area of surrounding redness. The base of an ulcer is typically grey/yellow in colour. Size varies according to the type of ulcer and this may range from a few millimetres in diameter to greater than one centimetre. What are the symptoms of recurrent aphthous stomatitis Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common condition in which round or ovoid painful ulcers recur on the oral mucosa Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common oral mucosal disorder found in men and women of all ages, races, and geographic regions. There are three forms of the lesions (minor, major, and herpetiform), with major aphthous ulcers causing significant pain and potential for scarring. In HIV Aphthous stomatitis is a common ailment, idiopathic in nature, with recurrent painful aphthous ulcers (commonly termed canker sores) on the non-keratinized oral mucous membranes. This activity reviews the evaluation and treatment of aphthous stomatitis, and the role of interprofessional teams caring for patients afflicted with this condition Recurrent aphthous stomatitis in Behçet's disease: clinical features and correlation with systemic disease expression and severity. Krause I, Rosen Y, Kaplan I, Milo G, Guedj D, Molad Y, Weinberger A J Oral Pathol Med 1999 May;28(5):193-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0714.1999.tb02023.x

Aphthous ulcers. Aphthous ulcers (also known as recurrent aphthous ulcers, aphthous stomatitis, recurrent aphthous stomatitis [RAS], or canker sores) are a common oral mucosal disease (eFigure 2-31 ). They are ulcerations with no known cause and a wide spectrum of severity and frequency of recurrence Herpetiform Ulcers This is the rarest breed of aphthous stomatitis, and is also called stomatitis herpetiformis, because the lesions resemble a primary infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. Fortunately, herpetiform ulceration is not caused by malevolent herpes viruses Aphthous Stomatitis Incidence. Mouth ulcers of this type are found more in women than men. It is common in babies, toddlers and adults. Around 50% of the global population seems to be affected with this disease. Herpetiform recurrent aphthous ulcer and major recurrent aphthous ulcer are not so common. Almost 80% of the cases reported show. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis have been classified in to three forms they are: Minor Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis. It is the familiar presentation affecting about 80% of patients. The ulcers are oval or round, recurrent, clearly defined and usually <5mm in diameter. These ulcers are very small and very painful. It is also Miculiz'sapthae Aphthous stomatitis is a common condition characterized by the repeated formation of benign and non-contagious mouth ulcers (aphthae) in otherwise healthy individuals. The informal term canker sores is also used, mainly in North America, although this term may refer to other types of mouth ulcers.The cause is not completely understood but involves a T cell-mediated immune response triggered.

Recurrent herpetiform ulcers Fig

Major aphthous ulcers may exceed 1 cm in diameter and occur anywhere in the mouth. They are more painful and protracted and often heal with scarring. Herpetiform aphthous ulceration produces painful vesicles and multiple tiny ulcers less than 2 mm in diameter. These coalesce to produce larger lesions and tend to recur frequently The patient with recurrent aphthous ulcers and the patient with recurrent herpes labialis: A study of two population samples. The Journal of the American Dental Association, 75(3), 645-654. Stone, O. (1991) (<70% of cases), major (10%), and herpetiform ulceration (10%) (Table 2). Recurrent aphthous stomatitis comprises recurrent bouts of one or more rounded, shallow, painful ulcers at intervals of a few months to a few days. Patients may have prodromal symptoms of tingling or burning be-fore the appearance of the lesions. During this initial peri While the occasional canker sore is one thing, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) can be even more bothersome. RAS is the term used when canker sores keep coming back. Merck Manuals estimates that 20 to 30 percent of adults have recurring canker sores, and the condition is even more common in children

Aphthous ulcers are painful ulcerations located on the mucous membrane, generally in the mouth, less often in the genital area. Three clinical forms of aphthous ulcers have been described: minor aphthous ulcers, herpetiform aphthous ulcers and major aphthous ulcers. Many other conditions presenting Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common ulcerative disease affecting the oral mucosa. RAS occurs mostly in healthy individuals and has an atypical clinical presentation in immunocompromised individuals. The etiology of RAS is still unknown, but several local, systemic, immunologic, genetic, allergic.

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and herpetiform ulcerations

HAU is a specific type of recurrent aphthous stomatitis and it often presents with groups of several small-sized (1-3 mm in diameter) ulcerations on the movable or non-keratinized oral mucosae (such as upper and lower labial mucosae, buccal mucosa, ventral tongue mucosa, and floor of mouth mucosa) ( Fig. 1 E, F, G and H). HAU lesions often heal within 7-10 days Background: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases in many parts of the world. However, there is very limited published clinical evidence for the therapies used in this condition. This could be partly due to the difficulty in evaluating the efficacy of oral ulcer treatment objectively Oral Pathology of Aphthous Stomatitis and Crohn's Disease May 7, 2019 Oral Pathology and Radiology Vesicular Ulcerative Conditions Audrey L. Boros MSc., DDS Sometimes patients will present with recurrent ulcerations of the oral cavity, and the frequency and severity are alarming Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Diagnosis and Management in Primary Care. Abstract. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (canker sores) is a very common oral condition that remains incompletely understood. Presentation has been well-classified into minor, major or herpetiform subcategories based on clinical features, but exact etiology is unknown

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis - National Institutes of Healt

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common condition in which round or ovoid painful ulcers recur on the oral mucosa. Etiology is unclear. Diagnosis is clinical. Treatment is symptomatic and usually includes topical corticosteroids. (See also Stomatitis and Evaluation of the Dental Patient . Herpetiform ulcers are the least common type affecting 5-10% of cases. The ulcers are small (1-2mm in diameter) and can occur in clusters of more than Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis April 2016 www.bsom.org.uk Other types of oral (systemic) therapy are reserved for severe cases of RAS (especially the major type) and various drugs have been. Herpetiform aphthous stomatitis is a rare variant, with multiple small ulcers, measuring a few millimeters, with a crop-like appearance. It usually coalesce to form a large lesion with irregular margin similar to HSV-related ulcers. The overall appearance is identical to the minor aphthous ulcers (although smaller in size), and these also heal.

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis - Etiology, serum

  1. Aphthous stomatitis is a painful and often recurrent inflammatory process of the oral mucosa that can appear secondary to various well-defined disease processes. Idiopathic recurrent aphthous stomatitis is referred to as recurrent aphthous stomatitis. The differential diagnosis for recurrent aphthous ulcerations is extensive and ranges from.
  2. Aphthous stomatitis, recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAUs), or canker sores constitute a common condition affecting 20% of the population. RAU is an idiopathic multifactorial disorder that can cause significant morbidity. Although usually self-limited, recurrence can be almost continuous
  3. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS)—otherwise known as canker sores, aphthous stomatitis, recurring oral aphthae, and recurrent aphthous ulceration—is a common cause of benign and noncontagious mouth ulcers, affecting about 20% of the general population.It is characterized by the appearance of an erythematous macule that develops into a painful, rounded or oval, ulcer covered with a yellow.
  4. Herpetiform Aphthous Stomatitis consists of a colony of as many as 5-100 ulcers measuring 1-3 mm and were similar to herpes simplex sores. Etiology and pathogenesis of RAS is not known for sure. Penatalaksanaan Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis ditujukan untuk mengurangi rasa sakit, atau mencegah timbulnya lesi baru.2 1. Tipe A. SAR yang.
  5. Primary oral herpes simplex may mimic recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) but usually occurs in younger children, always involves the gingiva and may affect any keratinized mucosa (hard palate, attached gingiva, dorsum of tongue), and is associated with systemic symptoms. Viral culture can be done to identify herpes simplex

What are characteristics of herpetiform recurrent aphthous

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is commonly known as mouth ulcer. RAS is a very common disease of the mouth. Hence, it is important for dental clinicians to know about the clinical features, causes, diagnostic techniques, and the treatment and management of RAS. Clinically, RAS is seen in three forms minor RAS, major RAS, herpetiform RAS. Belenguer-Guallar I, et al. Treatment of recurrent aphthous stomatitis: A literature review. Journal of Clinical Experimental Dentistry. 2014;6:e168. Akintoye SO, et al. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis

Essentials of recurrent aphthous stomatitis (Review)

Herpetiform recurrent aphthous stomatitis. These ulcers are tiny, and very painful. A high number, around twenty to thirty, can appear at once and may join to form larger areas of ulceration Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is the most common acute oral ulcerative condition in North America. RAS is divided into a mild, common form, simple aphthosis, and a severe, less common form, complex aphthosis. Aphthosis is a reactive condition. The lesions of RAS can represent the mucosal manifestation of a variety of conditions. These include conditions with oral and genital aphthae such. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common condition of the oral mucosa that presents in patients who are otherwise healthy. It is characterised by multiple, erythematous, recurrent, small, round or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, typically presenting first in childhood or adolescence. Scully C. Clinical practice: aphthous ulceration

Aphthous stomatitis, or recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAUs) or canker sores, are among the most common oral mucosal lesions physicians and dentists observe. Recurrent aphthous ulcer is a disorder of unknown etiology that can cause clinically significant morbidity names such as cold sores, canker sores, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), and recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU). This is the most prevailing oral ulcerative disorder affecting up to 10-20% of our inhabitants and recurrence rate of 3 months in 50% of population [3] Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is an oral ulcerative condition. Although a variety of host and environmental factors have been implicated, including trauma, nutritional deficiencies, and autoimmunity, the precise etiology remains unknown Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common condition of the oral mucosa that presents in patients who are otherwise healthy. It is characterized by multiple, erythematous, recurrent, small, round or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, typically presenting first in childhood or adolescence. [ 1] [ 2] Similar presentations of recurrent. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common condition of the oral mucosa that presents in patients who are otherwise healthy. It is characterized by multiple, erythematous, recurrent, small, round or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, typically presenting first in childhood or adolescence. Scully C. Clinical practice: aphthous ulceration

Aphthous Stomatitis: Treatment, Diagnosis, and Clinical

The relationship between recurrent aphthous stomatitis, and periodontal disease and Helicobacter Pylori infection. Clin Oral Investig. 2016 Jan 6. . Hijazi K, Lowe T, Meharg C, et al. Mucosal. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), also known as canker sores, is the most common disease of the oral mucosa. Unlike caries and periodontal disease, patients with RAS are unable to prevent it. The clinical picture of RAS is characterized by recurrent episodes of solitary or multiple painful ulcerations without association with systemic diseases

  1. DISTRIBUTION OF TYPES OF RECURRENT APHTHOUS STOMATITIS [RAS] BY RACE AND SEX TYPES OF MALAYS CmNESE INDIANS RECURRENT TOTAL PERCENTAGE APHTHOUS ULCERS M F M F M F 1. Minor 16 19 17 14 13 14 93 62.8 Aphthous Ulcer 2. Major 11 10 9 5 7 1 43 . 29.1 Aphthous Ulcer 3. Herpetiform 1 4 1-1 1 8 5.4 Ulcers 4. Behcet's-1 1 2-4 2.7 Syndrome TOTAL 28 34 27.
  2. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: a review. IntroductionAphthae (i.e., canker sores) have plagued mankind throughout recorded history and were first mentioned by Hippocrates (460-370 BC) who utilized the term Ôaphthai' to describe disorders of the mouth (1).Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS, aphthae, canker sores) is a common condition that is.
  3. or, major, and herpetiform), with major aphthous ulcers causing significant pain and potential for scarring. In HIV-infected individuals, these ulcers occur more frequently, last longer, and produce more painful.
  4. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the oral mucosa. It is characterized by painful mouth ulcers that cannot be explained by an underlying disease. Recurrent oral mucosal ulcers require a proper differential diagnosis to rule out other possible causes before recurrent aphthous stomatitis is diagnosed
  5. Herpetiform aphthous stomatitis Aphthous mouth ulcers (aphthae) are a common variety of ulcer that form on the mucous membranes, typically in the oral cavity (mouth). Other names for aphthous ulcers include aphthous stomatitis and canker sores. Aphthous ulcers are generally round in shape and form in the soft areas of the mout
  6. aphthous ulcers (MjAU) and herpetiform ulcers (HU) (see Table 1). There has been a tendency for clinicians to describe any ulcer occurring in the mouth as aphthous. However, aphthous ulcers have been carefully defined to allow differentiation from the many other types of recurrent ulcers occurring in the oral cavit

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis - Dental Disorders - MSD

Management strategies for HIV-associated aphthous stomatiti

  1. What are the clinical features of Herpetiform Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis? Few mms that fuse together to form larger ulcers, Affects both keratinised and non-keratinised mucosa, Heals without scarring in 10-14 days. What investigations are needed before a diagnosis of Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis is made and why
  2. Major recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MaRAS) is an uncommon and severe form of RAS, comprising oval or irregular ulcers that may exceed 1 cm in diameter. These ulcers have a predilection for the lips, soft palate, and fauces (but can affect any site), persist for up to 6 weeks, and often heal with scarring. Herpetiform (HU) is very uncommon.
  3. deficiencies or immune conditions such as celiac disease. A team of researchers Turkish Republic Health Ministry recently set out to deter
Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis | Pocket Dentistry

Aphthous ulcers can be classified into three different types: minor, major and herpetiform.1, 2 Minor aphthae are generally located on labial or buccal mucosa, the soft palate and the floor of the. Aphthous Ulcers (also known as aphthous stomatitis, canker sores) Single or multiple ulcerations of the oral mucosa; usually self-limiting, painful, or recurrent. Presentation. Population. Typical onset in childhood or early adulthood; Women affected more often than men; Signs. Minor aphthous ulcerations (Fig. 1) Approx. % of cases: 80

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is common and may affect 10 per cent of the population at some time during their lives. One in 15 patients have an underlying cause in some series which, if treated, will ameliorate or cure the condi-tion. One in three patients has a family history and the onset is usu-ally in the young Aphthous ulcers may also be called aphthous stomatitis or canker sores. Herpetiform aphthous ulcers are pinpoint in size and occur in clusters of 10 to 100. These are uncommon and usually, heal without scaring within a month. Recurrent aphthous ulcers may be a sign of a more serious underlying health problem Introduction. Recurrent aphthous ulceration or recurrent aphthous stomatitis is the most common oral mucosal disease known, [1,2,3,4] with a prevalence of up to 25% in the general population and 3. Clinically, 3 forms of recurrent aphthous ulceration exist: major, minor, and herpetiform. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is distinguished from aphthous-like ulceration by exclusion of underlying systemic conditions (e.g., Behcet's syndrome, HIV/AIDS, or cyclic neutropenia). Diagnosis is based on. of recurrent aphthous stomatitis, so therapy can attempt only to suppress symptoms. A R TIC L E 4 Background.Recurrent aphthous stom-atitis, or RAS, is a common oral disorder of uncertain etiopathogenesis for which symptomatic therapy only is available. This article reviews the current data on the etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and management of.

Aphthous Stomatitis - StatPearls - NCBI Bookshel

  1. Aphthous ulcers, or aphthae (canker sores), are the most common cause of recurring ulcers of the mucous membranes. They affect approximately 25% of the general population (estimates range from 20% up to 50%). The mouth is the most common site. The precise cause of aphthous ulceration is unknown, but studies point to a defect in regulation of.
  2. g hyaluronic acid containing mouth wash or a topical gel formulation on the healing of RAS and patient's quality of life
  3. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is one of the most common oral mucosal diseases seen by dental professionals, and yet its aetiology remains unclear, and its management based on less than robust evidence. The literature remains confused because of the lack of clarity in diagnosis and the lack of a standardised ulcer severity scoring system and agreed outcome measures
  4. The term 3 and 10 mm. Minor ulcers typically involve movable and aphthous stomatitis has been used interchangeably with nonkeratinized oral mucosa, principally the mucosa of the aphthous ulcers, but at present, the term aphthous sto- cheek, lip, floor of mouth, ventral and lateral surface of matitis is preferred.2 A higher.
  5. Herpetiform aphthous ulcers are very small (1-2 mm) grouped lesions ( 1, e4) (Figure 1c). They account for around 5% of recurrent oral aphthous ulcers, are extremely painful and persist for 7.
  6. or recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MiRAS), major recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MjRAS) and herpetiform ulceration. The clinical presentation of these types of RAS are shown in Table 2.1 Patients may sometimes present with a mixed pattern of RAS, but this is relatively uncommon. Minor recurrent aphthous stomatitis (MiRAS

Herpetiform aphthous stomatitis (Concept Id: C0585635

TABLE I. Classification of recurrent aphthous stomatitis Type Author Year % of cases11 Minor aphthous ulcers Mikulicz & Kiimmel [3] 1888 80 Major aphthous ulcers Sutton [5] 1911 8 Herpetiform ulcers Cooke [1] 1960 8 The remaining 4% of patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis fall into the other portion of the spectru The third variety of recurrent aphthous stomatitis There is no specific management for RAS, and is herpetiform ulcers, which present as multiple therefore analgesic, antimicrobial and immune small clusters of pin point lesions that can coalesce modulatory drugs have been used individually and to form large irregular ulcers and last 7 to 10 days Recurrent intraoral herpes occurs on the keratinized mucosa of the palate and gingiva, whereas aphthous stomatitis occurs almost exclusively on the nonkeratinized mucosa (Fig. 5). Aphthous stomatitis should not be confused with primary herpetic gingivosto-matitis due to the lack of both constitutional symptoms and of gingival involvement in the.

For recurrent aphthous stomatitis or recalcitrant aphthous stomatitis from underlying disease, first-line treatment consists of topical medications with use of systemic medications as necessary. Herein, the authors discuss the differential diagnosis and treatment ladder of aphthous stomatitis as described in the literature Recurrent aphthous stomatitis consists on recurring oral ulcers of unknown etiology.Oral ulcers may be different in number and size depending on the clinical presentation, which also determines the time needed for healing. [ncbi.nlm.nih.gov] ulceration.[8] Many of the systemic diseases cause other symptoms apart from oral ulceration, which is in contrast to aphthous stomatitis where there is. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a common condition, restricted to the mouth, that typically starts in childhood or adolescence as recurrent small, round, or ovoid ulcers with circumscribed margins, erythematous haloes, and yellow or gray floors. A positive family history of similar ulcers is common, and the natural history is typically..

Aphthous Stomatitis - an overview ScienceDirect Topic

Aphthous Stomatitis: Definition, Types, Causes, and Treatmen

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori. Med Oral Patol Oral Cir Bucal. 2016 Mar 1. 21 (2):e187-91. . Dhopte A, Naidu G, Singh-Makkad R, Nagi R, Bagde H, Jain S. Psychometric analysis of stress, anxiety and depression in patients with recurrent aphthous Stomatitis-A cross-sectional survey based study Aphthous stomatitis is a painful superficial oral ulcer that forms on the mucous membranes. Aphthous stomatitis are often found inside the lips, on the back part of the roof of the mouth (soft palate), on the cheeks, or on the tongue. Aphthous stomatitis is also called aphthae, aphthous ulcers, aphthosis or canker sores Objective: Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is a common disease of the oral mucosa, affecting 20 per cent of the general population. 1 However, the aetiology of this disease is unknown. This is the first controlled study to compare zinc levels in recurrent aphthous stomatitis patients with those of a well-matched, healthy, control population Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis has been described as presenting in three forms including minor aphthae, major aphthae and herpetiform aphthae . Minor aphthae account for 75-85 percent of all RAS cases and can involve any non-keratinized mucosa of the oral cavity. The characteristic lesions are smaller than 10 millimeters and heal within 7-14. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis, minor aph- thous ulcers. Three small aphthous ulcers are pre- sent on the right lateral tongue mucosa. Each is less than 1.0 cm in diameter and is covered by a tan flbromembranous slough. Minor aphthous ul- cers usually heal without scarring

Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a disease which presents as recurrent, round, shallow oral ulcerations surrounded by inflammation characterized by a break in the mucous membrane . RAS is one of the most common diseases of the oral mucosa affecting 20% of the general population Recurrent aphthous stomatitis can be divided into three categories according to the characteristics of the ulcer: major, minor, and herpetiform. The major form is characterized by painful ulcers (>10 mm) which erode the mucosa creating deep ulcers located on the palate, tonsils, pharynx, or tongue, which generally heal—often forming a scar. Aphthous stomatitis (also termed canker sores, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, RAS, recurring oral aphthae and recurrent aphthous ulceration) is a common cause of benign and non-contagious mouth ulcers (canker sores). This condition is characterized by the repeated formation of ulcers in the mouth, in otherwise healthy individuals Clinically, 3 forms of recurrent aphthous ulceration exist: major, minor, and herpetiform. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis is distinguished from aphthous-like ulceration by exclusion of underlying systemic conditions (e.g., Behcet syndrome, HIV/AIDS, or cyclic neutropenia). Diagnosis is based on th..

Aphthous Stomatitis - Causes, Symptoms, Treatment and

Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis: Why Do Canker Sores Keep

:: World Of Dentistry ::: Aphthous StomatitisLectPokbadok Blog: recurrent aphthous ulcersAphthous Stomatitis PicturesMinor Aphthous stomatitis